THESE ARE THE WRITTEN STATEMENTS FROM THE NC BOARD OF HOME INSPECTORS
AND NOT WRITTEN BY VIP INSPECTIONS.

Safety Issue: NC licensing board abridged recommended language. The gas piping in this house includes corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) which is an approved material in NC and still used today. But the building practices have changed since this house was built. There is no electrical bonding connection between the gas piping system and the electrical system, other than connections at the gas appliances that utilize the grounding conductors for the appliances. The lack of strong electrical bonding may increase the potential for lightning strikes to cause arcing at the CSST gas piping that may result in perforation of the piping, gas leaks, and fires. For safety, it is recommended that this installation be further investigated by a licensed electrical contractor.

Home Inspection Report & Summary Page recommended language related to incorrect installation of adhered masonry stone veneer cladding. Per the NC licensing Board for Home Inspectors.

THESE ARE THE WRITTEN STATEMENTS FROM THE NC BOARD OF HOME INSPECTORS AND NOT WRITTEN BY VIP INSPECTIONS.


Safety Issue: NC licensing board abridged recommended language. The gas piping in this house includes corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) which is an approved material in NC and still used today. But the building practices have changed since this house was built. There is no electrical bonding connection between the gas piping system and the electrical system, other than connections at the gas appliances that utilize the grounding conductors for the appliances. The lack of strong electrical bonding may increase the potential for lightning strikes to cause arcing at the CSST gas piping that may result in perforation of the piping, gas leaks, and fires. For safety, it is recommended that this installation be further investigated by a licensed electrical contractor.
Home Inspection Report & Summary Page recommended language related to incorrect installation of adhered masonry stone veneer cladding. Per the NC licensing Board for Home Inspectors.

Background: In recent years adhered masonry stone veneer cladding has been used with increased frequency on the exteriors of buildings. In many cases the installation has been found to be improper and not in compliance with the installation instructions of the stone manufacturers. Incorrect installation can result in water penetration, structural damage, and fungal growth. The following language is recommended for use by home inspectors with regard to incorrectly installed adhered masonry stone veneer cladding. The bulleted items should be used as deemed appropriate for the building inspected.

Recommended Language: Adhered masonry stone veneer cladding has been installed on this house. An inspection of the visible components suggests that the stone cladding system may not have been installed in such a way as to prevent water penetration behind the cladding.


At the time of the inspection, the following concerns related to the lack of proper detailing and flashing were observed:

  • No visible weep system was noted at the base of the wood frame walls or horizontal transitions.
  • No visible weep system was noted at the tops of window and/or door openings.
  • No visible sealants were noted along seams between the stone cladding and siding, trim, windows, and/or doors.
  • No indication of a flashing and/or weep system was noted where the stone cladding is in contact with roofing materials or along head flashings.
  • Metal lath was visible, indicating that the proper base coats of mortar were not applied prior to installation of the stone cladding.
  • The lack of proper detailing and flashing is conducive to water penetration behind the stone cladding and possible hidden damage to the home.

Additional concerns related to installation are listed below:

  • Clearances were not maintained between stone cladding and the ground and/or paved surfaces to prevent wicking and frost heave problems.
  • Clearances were not maintained between stone cladding and roofing materials to allow for proper drainage and future roof repairs and/or replacement


The installation of the stone cladding should be evaluated by a licensed general contractor and repaired as needed to correct any possible water penetration issues and verify that the stone cladding is installed to the specific installation requirements of the stone manufacturer and/or Masonry Veneer Manufacturer's Association (MVMA).

Please note that because the water resistive barrier, metal lath, and base coat(s) of cement stucco are completely concealed behind the stone cladding, they cannot be evaluated by a visual inspection.

Standards of Practice/Rules/Interpretations Committee approved: July 9, 2015 NCHILB Board approved: July 10, 2015 Effective Date: July 10, 2015 North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board

Recommended language for Polybutylene piping(PB)

Polybutylene plumbing supply lines (PB) are installed in this house. PB was used as water distribution piping in many homes built from the mid 1980's until the mid 1990's. The piping and associated fittings have had a failure rate and subsequent leakage sufficient to have been the subject of several nationwide class action lawsuits. Copper and brass fittings used in later

years seem to have reduced the failure rate, but the piping may still fail due to problems with poor installation, improper handling, or chemical reaction with the water supply.

Home Inspection Report & Summary Page - Recommended language for EIFS (synthetic stucco)

This house is clad with a synthetic stucco system known as Exterior Insulating Finishing System , also known as EIFS. EIFS is an exterior cladding system used widely in new construction and remodeling during the 1980's and 1990's. This material, while relatively maintenance free, may cause problems because moisture trapped behind its surface cannot escape, potentially resulting in decay of structural components. The most common source for water penetration behind the EIFS is at joints where it meets other materials. Problems with water infiltration due to improper installation of the system or simply leaks through other building components have led to numerous complaints and nationwide class action lawsuits against the installers and manufacturers of this product.

Revisions to installation requirements in the mid 1990's mandated the installation of a moisture barrier and drainage plane behind the EIFS, and this has reduced the potential for problems. A home inspector's visual inspection may not reveal the presence of water infiltration and structural deterioration. The client should have the exterior cladding of this home evaluated by a qualified EIFS inspector or competent stucco repair contractor, including testing for moisture behind the EIFS.

Standards of Practice/Rules/Interpretations Committee approved revisions :
4/12/12

Home Inspection Report & Summary Page recommended language related to electrical equipment.

Background: In recent years home inspections have revealed defects and safety concerns with some electrical panels and equipment. The following language is recommended for use by home inspectors as deemed appropriate for the building inspected.

Recommended Language: The main electrical panel is a Federal Pacific Electric “Stab - Loc” service panel. There have been multiple reports of problems associated with these electrical panels which could affect the safety and habitability of the home. Determination of specific potential problems for the equipment installed at this home is beyond the scope of a home inspection. Further investigation by a licensed electrical contractor is recommended to determine if the panel should be replaced and the approximate cost of replacement.

For more information visit:
http://inspectapedia.com/fpe/fpepanel.htm


The electrical distribution panel located (fill in blank) contains Zinsco equipment. There have been multiple reports of problems associated with this type of equipment that can affect the safety and habitability of the home.
These problems cannot be identified without removal of the circuit breakers, which is beyond the scope of a home inspection. Further investigation by a licensed electrical contractor is recommended to determine if the panel should be replaced and the approximate cost of replacement.


For more information on Zinsco electrical panels visit:
http://www.inspectapedia.com/electric/Zinsco.htm

Home Inspection Report & Summary Page - Recommended language for Deck Connections.

This applies to decks that are supported by their connection to the house and have no visible bolts attaching them to the house. Because of potential for corrosion and/or structural damage to the house framing components at the connection to the deck, there is significant potential for a weakened connection, even if there is no visible damage. The proposed recommended language is as follows:

Safety Issue: The deck is nailed to the house with no other visible means of attachment. Nails can corrode and fail behind the deck band causing the deck to collapse. Concealed damage to framing and/or siding behind the deck can also result in deck collapse. Unless it can otherwise be demonstrated that the deck attachment to the house is secure, the deck should be directly supported from below or bolted to the house. Have the deck attachment investigated and modified or repaired as deemed necessary by a licensed general contractor or professional engineer.

Home Inspection Report & Summary Page - Recommended language for Aluminum Wiring.

Single strand aluminum wire is present on 120 volt branch circuits in this house. This single strand, branch circuit aluminum wire was used widely during the 1960s and 1970s. According to reports published by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), problems due to overheating at the connections between the wire and devices such as switches, outlets, and light fixtures may have been responsible for house fires. It is recommended that the circuits using single strand aluminum wiring be evaluated and modified as may be deemed necessary by a licensed electrical contractor who is familiar with the problems inherent in this type of wiring. For more information on aluminum household wiring, refer to the National Electrical Code and the C.P.S.C. booklet "Repairing Aluminum Wiring."
The toll - free hotline number for obtaining this booklet is 1-800-638-2772
Date Approved: January 16, 2009
Effective Date: Immediately